Program

August 9 & 10, 2017- Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health 2017 Summer Gathering

Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Room 208

Introduction

The Summer Gathering is a space for individual and community knowledge construction on health based on Indigenous ways of teaching and learning. The Summer Gathering is a Summer Research Institute based on Indigenous pedagogies applied to Indigenizing the health research field for graduate students and post-doctoral students from any university. As relationality is the main paradigm adopted, the Summer Gathering will offer respectful spaces for participants to share, live, learn, and create routes of knowledges that are ethically founded on Indigenous worldviews. It is expected that each experience will offer innovative ways to connect both western scientific and Indigenous sciences and knowledges from different commonalities of the Indigenous communities focusing on historical, current, and future Indigenous communities’ challenges.

Pedagogical Approaches

Learning is promoted from individual and systemic knowledge construction, which involves each learner’s personal levels (cognition, emotion, identity) community and nature levels, and knowledge building and sacred ceremony. Knowledge starts from inside the person and evolves in personal routes or rhizomes following personal growing directions, connected with Indigenous worldviews. It is expected that participants will have the opportunity to participate in this process, and discover the journey of commonalities of scientific health research and health research based on Indigenous worldviews. Participants will be provided with routes of growing and knowledge construction as a personal intimate process that is embedded in concepts and practices of community.

The overarching goal of the Summer Gathering is to bring to together diverse knowledges and practices regarding different four topics within Indigenous health to synthesize experiences, views, and generate relationships and collaborations towards healing solutions in research. The Summer Gathering will provide a place for knowledge to be composed by Elders, local Indigenous community members, Indigenous health scholars, local Indigenous agencies, government agencies, and graduate students. In a non-hierarchic and dynamic structure, all participants will share, build, and revisit knowledge around the main topics proposed in three phases. In the phase one, participants will receive, in advance by email, articles or other texts about the topics that will be discussed in the Summer Gathering. In phase two, knowledge construction will be focused on the experience and topics of health research from Indigenous worldviews that connects highly academic research experiences and community based practice.

Learning is considered as an individual journey, where the individual is connected with the Indigenous community, participants will be provided of a personal Journal to record their personal knowledge development and will allow the participants to have notes for sharing (when and where applicable). Participants will also be encouraged at various times to use their ‘creative side’; some traditional Indigenous activities (beading, tobacco tying, braiding sweet grass, or creating word or fine art) will be available for participants to chronicle the knowledge they have acquired, synthesized, or intend to build upon.

Relationship Building and Futures

The third phase of the Gathering is focused on collaboration and community building. It will start after the face to face phase is finished, by using the online community website participants will be able to give feedback, access additional information, and share with the community new developments on their projects and research. It is also a way to share what we learn from the Summer Gathering and explore possibilities for future developments.

Program

Day One – August 9th

9:00 – 9:30am Spiritual Opening with Elder Clayton Shirt

9:30 – 9:45am Welcome and Housekeeping – Dr. Suzanne Stewart

9:50 – 11:10am Topic 1: Mental Health

Short presentations by:

Dr. Renee Linklater, Centre for Addictions and Mental Health

*TBD – Government

Mr. James Carpenter, Traditional Healer, Anishnawbe Health Toronto (invited)

11:10 – 11:20am – Break

11:20 – 12:20pm – Networking and Discussions

 

Participants will have time to meet other participants at their table or other tables to discuss issues in Indigenous mental health. Participants are encouraged to move about and change tables as they see fit. One person from each small group takes notes to share with larger group.

 

Potential questions:

  • What are some of the Indigenous mental health challenges in First Nations and Inuit communities (on reserve)?
  • What are some of the Indigenous mental health challenges for First Nations, Métis and Inuit in urban or off reserve communities?
  • What can be done to improve Indigenous mental health and the issues surrounding mental health?
  • Who should be a part of these discussions? Can participants here work toward strategic goals to improve Indigenous mental health? How?
  • Are there other countries or examples of programs that can be looked at?
  • What research would you like to conduct in this area?
  • Are there collaborators, principal or co-investigators here that could work with you to discuss Indigenous mental health now or in the future?

12:20 – 12:30pm – Popcorn of ideas and adding ideas to the Parking Wall

12:30 – 1:30pm – Lunch

1:30 – 2:45pm Topic 2: Housing/Homelessness

Short Presentations by:

Dr. Suzanne Stewart, WBIIH, DLSPH

Ms. Karen Smith, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, Division,

City of Toronto

Mr. Bob Sleeper, Indigenous Eviction Prevention Case Manager, St. Stephen’s

Community House

2:45 – 2:55pm – Break

2:55 – 3:45pm Networking and Discussions

 

Find a table, or take a small group for a walk to discuss about Indigenous housing and/or homelessness. One person from each small group takes notes to share with larger group.

Potential Questions:

  • What are some of the housing issues for First Nations? Métis? Inuit?
  • What are some of the homeless issues for First Nations? Métis? Inuit?
  • What are some of the housing and/or homeless issues in urban and off reserve settings?
  • Are there ways to improve Indigenous housing issues?
  • Are there ways to improve Indigenous homelessness issues?
  • Are there other countries or examples of programs that can assist in improving housing and/or homeless for Indigenous people?
  • What research would you like to conduct in this area?
  • Are there collaborators, principal or co-investigators here that you could work with you to discuss Indigenous housing and/or homelessness issues?

3:45 – 4:00pm Popcorn ideas and Housekeeping

4:00 – 5:00pm Spirit Art Workshop

Day Two – August 10th

9:00 – 9:30am Spiritual Opening and Traditional teaching by Elder Clayton Shirt

9:30 – 9:50am Review ideas from the Parking Wall, a summary of previous and current agenda.

9:50 – 11:00am Topic 3: Indigenous Worldviews and Health Care

Short presentations by:

Dr. Angela Mashford-Pringle, WBIIH, DLSPH

Dr. Heather Manson, Public Health Ontario

Ms. Constance McKnight, (de dwa da dehs nye’s Aboriginal Health Centre)

11:00 – 11:15am Break

11:15 – 12:20 pm Networking and Discussion

Find a table, take a walk with a small group or move from table to table to discuss issues around Indigenous worldview, spirituality or culture and bio-medical health care (specifically in Ontario). One person from each small group takes notes to share with larger group.

Potential questions:

  • What are some of the issues with the bio-medical system and Indigenous worldviews?
  • How can the issues be resolved?
  • Is there a need to have traditional healing and wellness practices in bio-medicine?
  • What does it look like to have both traditional healing and wellness and bio-medicine in the same place?
  • What research can be done in this area?
  • Are there collaborators, principal and co-investigators here that you could work with to improve/change/impact bio-medicine systems in a positive Indigenous way?

12:20 – 12:30pm Popcorn some ideas for the Parking wall

12:30 – 1:30pm Lunch and Networking

1:30 – 2:45pm Topic 4: Indigenous People & Chronic Disease

Short Presentations by:

Dr. Mike Anderson, DLSPH and Princess Margaret Hospital

Dr. Amanda Sheppard, Aboriginal Cancer Care Ontario

Ms. Susan Lamure, Indigenous Community Member

2:45 – 3:00pm – Break

3:00 – 4:00pm Networking and Discussion

Find a table or move between tables to discuss issues of Indigenous people and chronic disease. One person from each small group takes notes to share with larger group.

Potential Questions:

  • What are the chronic illnesses/diseases that need to be examined for Indigenous people?
  • What can be done to have an upstream approach for chronic illness/disease?
  • What best practices are occurring in other areas that might be useful for Indigenous chronic illness/disease like diabetes, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, heart disease, cancer, etc.?
  • Who should be involved in research or interventions for Indigenous peoples and at what time (preventative, intervention, or maintenance)?
  • Are there collaborators, principal or co-investigators here that you could work with to improve chronic illness in the Indigenous population?

4:00 – 4:15pm Spiritual closing and website information for further networking

4:15 – 5:00pm Spirit Wind Drumming Workshop